References

PART 1

Fink, L. D. (2013). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses (2nd ed.). San‐Francisco: Jossey‐Bass, 2003.


PART 2

Inkelas, K. K., Williams, A. L., & Maeng, J. L. (2018, February). Crafting Success for Underrepresented Scientists and Engineers (CSUSE) Research Project: Interim Technical Report. Tysons, VA: LMI Research Institute and Commonwealth Center for Advanced Logistics Systems (CCALS).

Maehr, M., & Meyer, H. (1997). Understanding motivation and schooling: Where we've been, where we are, and where we need to go. Educational Psychology Review, 9, 371-409.

Ryan, R. M., & Deci, E. L. (2000). Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well-being. American Psychologist, 55, 68-78.

Strayhorn, T. L. (2019). College Students' Sense of Belonging: A Key to Educational Success for All Students (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.

Svinicki, M. D. (2004). Learning and motivation in the postsecondary classroom. Bolton, MA: Anker.

Wigfield, A., & Eccles, J. S. (2000). Expectancy-value theory of achievement motivation. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 25, 68-81.


PART 3
Ames, C. (1992). Classrooms: Goals, structures, and student motivation. Journal of Educational Psychology, 84(3), 261-271. doi: 10.1037/0022-0663.84.3.261

Grant, H., & Dweck, C. S. (2003). Clarifying achievement goals and their impact. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 85(3), 541-553. doi: 10.1037/0022-3514.85.3.541

Harnish, R. J., & Bridges, K. R. (2011). Effect of syllabus tone: students' perceptions of instructor and course. Social Psychology of Education, 14(3), 319–330.

Ludy, M., Brackenbury, T., Folkins, J. W., Peet, S. H., Lagendorfer, S. J., & Beining, K. (2016). Student Impressions of syllabus design: engaging versus contractual syllabus. International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 10(2), 1-23.

O’Brien, J. G., Millis, B.J., & Cohen, M. (2008). The course syllabus: A learning-centered approach (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Palmer, M. S., Bach, D. J., & Streifer, A. C. (2014). Measuring the promise: A learning‐focused syllabus rubric. To improve the academy: A journal of educational development, 33(1), 14-36.

Palmer, M.S., Wheeler, L. B., & Aneece, I. (2016). Does the document matter? The evolving role of syllabi in higher education. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 48(4), 36-47.

Ryan, R. M., & Deci, E. L. (2000). Intrinsic and extrinsic motivations: Classic definitions and new directions. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 25, 54-67. doi: 10.1006/ceps.1999.1020

Saville, B. K., Zinn, T. E., Brown, A. R., & Marchuk, K. A. (2010). Syllabus detail and students’ perceptions of teacher effectiveness.
Teaching of Psychology, 37, 186–189, doi: 10.1080/00986283.2010.488523

Stevens, E. M., & Gibson, R. (2017). An examination of mastery- and performance-based orientations in strategic communication syllabi and suggestions for rhetorical and pedagogical improvement. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 28(2), 61-80.


PART 4
Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambride, MA, Harvard University Press.

Fink, L. D. (2013). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses (2nd ed.). San‐Francisco: Jossey‐Bass.

Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Wulff, D. H., & Jacobson, W. H. (2005). Aligning for learning: Strategies for teaching effectiveness. Bolton, MA: Anker.


PART 5
Boud, D. (1988). Moving toward autonomy. In D. Boud (Ed.), Developing student autonomy in learning (pp. 17-39). (2nd ed.). London: Taylor & Francis.

Palmer, M. S., Gravett, E. O., & LaFleur, J. (2018). Measuring transparency: A learning‐focused assignment rubric. To Improve the Academy, 37(2), 173-187. doi:10.1002/tia2.20083.


PART 6
Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers (2nd ed.). San-Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Barkley, E. F. (2010). Student engagement techniques: A handbook for college faculty. San-Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Barkley, E. F., Cross, K. P., & Major, C. H. (2014). Collaborative learning techniques: A Handbook for college faculty (2nd ed.). San-Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Barkley, E. F., & Major, C. M. (2018). Interactive lecturing: A handbook for college faculty. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Bean, J. C. (2011). Engaging ideas: The professor's guide to integrating writing, critical thinking, and active learning in the classroom (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Brown, P.C., Roediger, H. L., & McDaniel, M.A. (2014). Make it stick: The science of successful learning. Cambride, MA, Harvard University Press.

Deslauriers, L., Schelew, E., & Wieman, C. (2011). Science, 332, 862-864.

Hake, R. R. (1998). Am. J. Phys, 66, 64-74.

Pashler, H., McDaniel, M., Rohrer, D., & Bjork, R. (2008). Learning styles concepts and evidence. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 9, 105-119.


PART 7
Grunert O'Brien, J., Millis, B. J., & Cohen, M. W. (2008). The course syllabus: A learning-centered approach (2nd ed). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Palmer, M.S., Wheeler, L. B., & Aneece, I. (2016). Does the document matter? The evolving role of syllabi in higher education. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 48(4), 36-47.


PART 8